Telluride 43: “Wakefield”

“Wakefield”, based on a short story by E.L. Doctorow, has a very effective role for Bryan Cranston. With ominous music, a power outage delays his nightly trek to his suburban home from his job in the city and Wakefield (Cranston) decides to radically change his routine. He hides in a storage attic from which he gets a view of his wife (Jennifer Garner) and children, observing how they react to the increasingly long disappearance.

Jennifer Garner and Bryan Cranston at the Telluride Film Festival (c) Ed Scheid

Much of the film focuses on Cranston’s voice-over of Wakefield’s thoughts, well-written by director Robin Swicord (“The Jane Austin Book Club”). He considers the suburbs a place “apart from nature”. Wakefield laughs as the “plot thickens.”

The focus stays with Wakefield and this film maintains interest from the wide range of emotion Cranston conveys in his character’s impressions, from sarcasm, to jealousy, to mystification at how well his family is adjusting without him, while missing contact with them. Wakefield reassesses his relationships.

Jennifer Garner, Bryan Cranston, Robin Swicord, moderator Leonard Maltin at Telluride Festival
(c) Ed Scheid

Wakefield’s appearance changes radically as he moves onto the suburban street for secret foraging. Garner is a likable presence as the wife mostly seen from her husband’s viewpoint.

After the film screening at the Telluride Film Festival, Robin Swicord, the writer/director of “Wakefield”, described the film as getting into the mind of this man. She said the Doctorow short story, in which the “serious and comic intertwined” had “haunted me”. The story was written in the first person. Swicord added that the film explores what makes a marriage.

Jennifer Garner, Bryan Cranston, Robin Swicord at Telluride Festival (c) Ed Scheid

Bryan Cranston described the film as an “intriguing journey, very challenging.” He said the 20 day shoot was collaborative, that Swicord gave him the freedom of a “wonderful permission to try.” He said that an “actor has to trust the director.”

Advertisements

French Rendez-Vous 2017: “Heal the Living”

The recent Rendez-Vous with French Cinema series again brought a wide range of French films to Lincoln Center in New York City. For extra insight, filmmakers appeared to discuss their work. The series opened with “Django”, a well-acted but rather conventional film about gypsy jazz musician Django Reinhardt and his conflicts with the Nazis.

Reda Kateb as “Django”

The finest films included “From the Land of the Moon” with a superb performance by Marion Cotillard as woman with a romantic obsession, “150 Milligrams”, a fascinating film based on true incidents about a female doctor fighting a large pharmaceutical corporation because of a defective drug, and “The Dancer”, a biography of Loi Fuller who left the American West to become the toast of La Belle Epoque Paris.

Other films ranged from young terrorists in Paris (“Nocturama”), Natalie Portman as part of a touring spiritualism act (“Planetarium”), and a bizarre comedy about attempts to import a French ski resort to the South American jungle (“Struggle for Life”).

Gabin Verdet in “Heal the Living”

“Heal the Living” begins as a teenage Simon (Gabin Verdet) leaves to join his friends on a surfing expedition. Director Katell Quillévéré has shot visually stunning scenes of the young men surfing, capturing their euphoria on the waves. Simon is seriously injured in an accident and the film becomes an emotionally powerful study of unexpected connections that can result from a tragedy.

Emmanuelle Seigner and Kool Shen in “Heal the Living”

The screenplay, co-written by Quillévéré, sensitively depicts the variety of characters joined by Simon’s accident. The film is extremely moving due to uniformly strong performances, particularly from Emmanuelle Seigner (“Venus in Fur”), devastating as the injured man’s anguished mother. There are other compelling portraits by Anne Dorval as a musician with a degenerative disease and Tahar Rahim (“A Prophet”) as a compassionate medical professional working with transplants.

Flashbacks show Simon’s exuberant high spirits, emphasizing his loss.

Quillévéré builds acute tension in showing the steps leading to a heat transplant, climaxing with an unflinching view of the surgery.

Future posts will cover more Rendez-Vous films.