Telluride 43: Richard Gere as “Norman”

The title role in “Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer” is a strong fit for Richard Gere as a man trying to pass himself as a business “consultant”. Norman continually tries to cultivates insiders, attempting to insinuate himself to prominent people with whom he can make the latest “business opportunity”. He uses contacts, however tenuous, for getting into prominent social events.

Richard Gere and Lior Ashkenazi in “Norman”

In Gere’s skillful performance, desperation comes through Norman’s fast talking. Norman remains driven, hopeful that his mostly futile luck may change. Not as successful as he pretends to be, Norman is shown taking his “office” calls on a cell phone in an alley, even sitting on garbage bags.

The impressively varied supporting cast includes Michael Sheen (“The Queen”) as a sympathetic relative of Norman, Steve Buscemi as his rabbi, and Charlotte Gainsbourg (“Nymphomaniac”) as a fellow passenger.

Richard Gere in “Norman”

The film is written and directed by Joseph Cedar who made the memorable Israeli film “Footnote” (2011). Cedar directs this absorbing film at a lively pace with visual inventiveness. The screenplay takes some clever turns, particularly after Norman befriends an Israeli politician (Lior Ashkenazi) who becomes Prime Minister, giving Norman some unexpected opportunities.

At an outdoor panel at the Telluride Film Festival, Cedar said it was “amazing” that so many gentile actors “resembled my family.” He added in the “most crowded” New York City, “nobody cares” when you’re shooting a film, describing the location as “vibrant…dizzy…amazing.”

Telluride 43: “Graduation”

“Graduation” is a gripping depiction of pervasive corruption in contemporary Romania. Cristian Mungiu, who also wrote the screenplay, received the Best Director Award at Cannes. This film is even stronger than Mungiu’s Palme d’Or-winning “4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days”.

Cristian Mungiu at Telluride

Before the film’s screening at Telluride, Mungiu said the inspiration of the film was the process of his “being a father”. While some of his fellow citizens have left Romania, Mungiu believes it is better to stay and attempt to change conditions.

Romeo (Adrian Titieni) is a rare doctor who has remained honest in a system where even doctors are bribed for service. He is hopeful that his daughter Eliza (Maria-Victoria Dragus) will receive a scholarship for the UK, and thus have options unavailable to him and his wife Magda (Lia Bugnar). A violent act against Eliza may affect her performance on the examination that determines if she will be able to study outside Romania.

Adrian Titieni and Maria-Victoria Dragus in “Graduation”

As a father, Romeo is determined to do whatever is necessary for his daughter to have an education abroad. There is also family discord as Eliza begins to develop an independence from her father. Adrian Titieni gives a powerful performance as the highly conflicted father. Mungiu builds an acute tension as Romeo becomes involved in a web of complications and he must face the choice of compromising his integrity by making secret deals to give his daughter a better life. “What does all we taught her count?” is asked.

Maria-Victoria Dragus and Adrian Titieni and in “Graduation”